customer service

Glen Roberts

The Evolution of Industrial Vibrators: From Pneumatics to Electric Powered Vibrators in the 20th Century

Glen Roberts
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The Cleveland Vibrator Company started manufacturing air operated vibrators in 1923 and for several years air vibrators is all we pretty much offered. This worked well in our primary foundry customer base through the first half of the 20th century. As we expanded our customer base, we found more and more customers wanting to use electrical power to operate the industrial vibrators. It became obvious that we needed to give our sales staff an alternate source besides air to offer our valued customers.

88-mc-2-electromagnetic-continuous-duty-vibrator-aid-large-chain-of-bakery-plantsWe started with fairly basic electromagnetic vibrators with the MC-1, MC-2 etc. and started to introduce these units into the market place. The MC series is considered the “grandfather” to our current CM-5, CM-10 and CM-30 and more recent Super 30 vibrators. You can see a success story of this product in the field in the case study on the right hand side of this paragraph. In the early 60’s, we contracted with a company from Sweden called Dynapac to market and sell their rotary electric vibrators mostly here in North America. They were supplied in 1800 RPM and 3600 RPM (revolutions per minute) which opened the door to customers having hoppers, bins, chutes, bunkers as well as other applications which include vibratory tables, feeder and screeners. Read More…

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Mike Stratis

What Are the Costs Associated with Installing Pneumatic Vibrators?

Mike Stratis
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When it comes time to review solutions to the material flow problems inside the hopper, pipe or chute, there are a few things to keep in mind when putting together a budget for the project. Besides the vibratory flow aid itself, there are additional components required before installing the unit. We will discuss these items and estimated costs to acquiring these components. Here is the short list:

  1. Industrial Vibrator – pneumatic piston vibrator, single impact air knocker, pneumatic turbine vibrator, pneumatic ball vibrator
  2. Safety cable
  3. Mounting channel or plate
  4. Hose to connect vibrator to on/off valve
  5. On/off valve
  6. Hose to connect on/off valve to air prep component (filter/regulator or filter/regulator/lubricator)
  7. Lubricant (if necessary)

Depending on the size of the hopper or piece of equipment that the pneumatic vibrator is going to be installed on, the price of the vibrator itself can range from about $100 to as much as $10,000. But, within that range, vast majority of the units are going to be between $100-$1000. Read More…

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Glen Roberts

Niche Business, It’s What We Do

Glen Roberts
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All organizations that have stayed in business for many years have “go-to folks” they depend on when difficult situations or tough problems arise that need to be taken care of. For example, how many times have we watched a football game and experienced the quarterback take his team 90 yards in under two minutes to win a game or the linebacker or safety make that key tackle or interception for a last minute victory? If you root for every team but the Browns, we’re sure you’ve experienced this enough to know the importance the role these key players fulfill. These are go to folks and it is no different in the business world, especially here at The Cleveland Vibrator Co.

I think we are blessed with several go to folks on our team. When a customer calls Cleveland Vibrator, they are not just talking to a sales associate but to engineering, manufacturing, purchasing, marketing, shipping and yes, even our owners from time to time. I believe this collectively makes Cleveland Vibrator a “go to company” for many special applications. I call this our “NICHE” business and feel it has been one of Cleveland Vibrator’s strengths, even before I was given the opportunity to join the team in 1968. Read More…

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David Strong

Measuring “Force Output” of the (SI) Single Impact Air Knocker Series

David Strong
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Recently one of our sales team reps was working with a potential customer on a Single Impact (SI) vibrator application.  At some point in the conversation the issue of force output of the unit came up and there was some comparison with an unknown competitor’s model.

I’ve written at least a couple of blogs talking about documenting the performance of piston vibrators, both air cushioned and impact piston pneumatic vibrators.  One of the big questions is what is a meaningful “number” for the force output and how do we arrive at that number.  For an air cushioned piston vibrator, as mentioned before it’s pretty easy, data can be collected and calculations made.  Impact units such as the 1200 VMS present a few more wrinkles but again, I think we’ve got a reasonable method of documenting the vibrators Read More…

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Glen Roberts

Vibration Force: Is Faster Actually Better?

Glen Roberts
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I have attached some photographs of a couple vibrators returned to Cleveland Vibrator for evaluation over the past year. It’s pretty clear that these units were not operated as per our operation manuals would instruct. Human nature causes us to try and make something work better or faster, we are the products of an an instant gratification way of life. We believe that products can work up to our lofty expectations even though we know it will work best to follow instructions in a user’s manual and to operate the product as instructed. As we used to hear at the beginning of the Six Million Dollar Man TV show many years past,”We have the technology to make it bigger, faster and stronger.” This hold true in many cases, especially relating to air piston vibrators, we shorten the life of the vibrator by believing we can use such technologies to override suggested operating specs. Read More…

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David Strong

How to Adjust the Eccentric Weight on Rotary Electric Vibrators

David Strong
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In a recent blog I talked about the importance of “Counter rotation and synchronization” in the successful operation and maintenance of a piece of Cleveland Vibrator Company’s vibratory equipment. In that blog I briefly touched on the procedure to be followed when adjusting the eccentric weights on a rotary electric vibrator.  The procedure to set the weights correctly is rather straight forward but given how critical the proper set up is to the operation and the longevity of the unit to which the vibrator is attached, I decided to devote some additional time to this topic.   This will give me an opportunity to go more in depth with a step by step procedure.

First a bit of math to help get a better understanding of the importance of the weight setting and its impact on the operation of the vibrator itself and more importantly on the piece of equipment.  Any type of rotating vibrator, that includes rotary electric (RE), ball vibrators or turbine vibrators generate their “vibratory force” by rotating a mass about the center of the unit or shaft in the case of a rotary electric vibrator.  The force produced is dependent on three parameters:

  1. Weight of the rotating mass
  2. The distance of the center of gravity of that mass from the center of rotation and
  3. The rotational speed

Read More…

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David Strong

3 Ways To Measure The Strike Force Of A Pneumatic Vibrator

David Strong
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Recently the sales team forwarded the following question from a customer –

“We use some of your impulse piston vibrators to fill molds with powder. Do you have a recommendation for a way to measure the strike force such as a G-force meter or Accelerometer? Any ideas you have would be greatly appreciated.”

This seems like a pretty straight forward question but upon closer inspection, it gets a bit more complex.  So let’s break it down and look at the pieces of the question.  It’s always important to make sure we’re on the same page in our understanding of the question and terminology used. Read More…

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Mike Stratis

The Importance of Proper Installation of Industrial Vibrators

Mike Stratis
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“If you don’t have the time to do it right, when will you have the time to do it again?” – John Wooden, former UCLA Men’s Basketball Coach and Presidential Medal of Freedom award winner.

We have a few frequently asked questions in regards to bin vibrators and many of them revolve around how to get the unit installed. Here is the down and dirty:

  1. Determine the best location of the piston vibrator. Keep in mind, sometimes multiple vibrators are necessary for proper material flow out of bins and hoppers. It comes down to the diameter of the bin or hopper. If the hopper diameter is less and 8 ft. wide, only 1 vibratory unit is necessary. For medium sized hopper that fall within the 8-15 ft. width, 2 units will get the job done. Lastly, large hoppers and bin with a diameter greater than 15 ft. require 3 vibrators.For multiple vibrator unit installs, placement is key. Mount the vibrator to the hopper wall 1/3 the distance from the discharge to the top of the sloped wall. Should a second vibrator be necessary, it should be mounted opposite and approximately 1/4 way up the sloped wall. For large hopper applications requiring three vibrators, mount the third vibrator 1/2 way up the sloped wall.

    The rule of thumb is that a correctly sized vibrator will have an approximate 5ft. radius of influence on material and structure, but when in doubt as to where to install your vibrator, think about where your problem point is and make sure vibration gets to it.

  2. Stitch weld the mounting channel or stiffener plate to the bin wall. Leave the corners on the mounting medium (channel or plate) free of weld. To see why, check out Craig Macklin’s blog titled, “Vibrators Don’t Damage Equipment, Wrong Installations Do.” 
  3. Use the grade 5 fasteners provided by CVC. Tighten them down. The VMS, VMSAC and SI series offer the 4-bolt pattern. This may take an extra few minutes but it offers twice the support compared to 2-bolt pattern units.
  4. Thread the provided port protector or muffler included with the pneumatic vibrator into the exhaust port. Securely tighten.
  5. Loop the safety cable through the hole in the casting as a precautionary measure. Always put safety first!

Read More…

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Glen Roberts

Customer Service is Not a Department, It’s an Attitude.

Glen Roberts
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I was processing a very nice order from one of our resale accounts in Texas and it reminded me of how we lost then re-acquired them and they have now become one of our better accounts. They started with Cleveland Vibrator back in 1994 and would order industrial vibrators here and there up to 1999, then simply vanished off our radar. Seven years later, in 2006, they contacted our marketing person at that time about purchasing weight covers for Rotary Electric Vibrators. I believe these motors were used on dewatering screeners. From what it would seem, one of our competitors would not supply this company with the weight covers and only wanted to sell them the complete drive motor. This simply doesn’t work since the weight covers serve two very important functions. One is to keep impurities and foreign matter out of the electric vibrator, not allowing the accumulation of the matter on the weights. Two, the covers act as a safety shield from anyone coming in to contact with the rotating eccentric weights. Read More…

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