screening machines

Why Recycle Glass? The Answer Is Clear

Katy Sabo

Remember the days of “Tube TVs” and “Low Radiation” computer screens?

I remember walking into Cleveland Vibrator and seeing, what I would describe as, the land of misfit computer screens that had been stored away through the many years that Cleveland Vibrator has been in business. One day they disappeared and the land of misfits was replaced by trade show accessories. Working here has opened my eyes to the many industries that don’t get the attention they well deserve, especially recycling. Recently, I was invited to visit a customer whose specialty was Glass Recycling of old TV screens and computer monitors. Ding, ding, ding, the lightbulb went off… this is where those “misfits” disappeared to. This got me thinking, what exactly can recycled glass be used for?

The glass used for these old monitors and displays is referred to as CRT, Cathode Ray Tube Glass, and it is estimated that the typical CRT device is made up of between 15 to 90 pounds of glass (depending on device) that protects the users from the radiation produced by the electron gun and beam gun inside that device. Since the emerging high demand of LCD, LED and Plasma Screens of the 2000s, it is an estimated 57 million computers and televisions are sold annually in the U.S. according to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Households are now discarding old models of outdated technology at a much higher rate than we have ever seen before. Read More…

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What You Need to Know About Screening Media – Part Deux

Jack Steinbuch

This blog is the second in a series that will be dedicated to typical screening medias that are installed in Vibratory Screeners. I will discuss their advantages and disadvantages so you can be in a better position to assist us in the selection process.

Perforated Plate

This is also a fairly common and widely used screening media for many applications including scalping, sizing and dewatering.  Perforated plate, as relates to sections installed in vibratory screeners, is typically designated by the openings, the bar width (amount of material between the openings), centers (distance between the holes as well as staggered or straight line) and thickness. Read More…

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What You Need To Know About Screening Media: Woven Wire Cloth, Part I.

Jack Steinbuch

There are a wide variety of screening media that can be installed in vibratory screeners.  Our challenge is to select which type would be best suited for your application.  You can refer back to my blog: Importance of screening data from May 2013 to review the technical data that would best assist us in making screener recommendations.  Some of this data would also be appropriate for selecting screening media. This blog is the first in a series that will be dedicated to typical screening media that are installed in Vibratory Screeners with their advantages and disadvantages so you can be in a better position to assist us in the selection process.

Woven Wire Cloth

This is the most common and widely used screening media for many applications including scalping, sizing and dewatering.  Woven wire cloth is typically designated as space screen (clear openings) or square mesh.  Space screen is the inside dimensions of the opening which should be further designated with a specific wire diameter.  Please note that the wire diameter doesn’t affect the screen opening Read More…

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How You Can Reduce Plug Blinding During Screening

Jack Steinbuch

Let’s begin by defining “blinding of a screen”. Blinding is when there is a decrease in the open area of a screen due to coating or plugging. We are going to focus on plug blinding as it has become more prevalent due to the increase in recycling. Plug blinding occurs when you are screening material that contains particles with irregular shapes similar to candy corn where the point can fall into a screen opening and then gets stuck or plugs the opening which prevents fine material from passing. Eventually the screen section can lose its screening effectiveness as more of these particles plug into screen openings. Since this material wedges into the screen opening, the vibration energy used to screen the material isn’t always sufficient to knock them out of the opening. The recycling of plastics for one creates irregularly shaped materials that can plug openings thereby adversely affecting screening. Read More…

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Fine Powder Screening and Timely Solutions: Ultrasonic Sieving Systems

Jeff Hochadel

Sometimes a screening application cannot be solved by simply placing the product on the sieve surface and allowing the screener to do its job. While a round screener is meant to separate product by particle size, sometimes this simple process can cause problems or damage the product. Recently, a customer inquired about fine mesh ultrasonic sieving of his solder powder. While I am no expert in the production of solder powder, I do know solder powder is generally a very spherical powder (see pic below) and sieves very well when applying ultrasonic to the screen surface. Read More…

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Innovative Solutions to Industrial Fine Mesh Screening Challenges from Cleveland Vibrator Co.

Jeff Hochadel

Over the years I have handled hundreds of sales calls. Some are looking for new equipment while other are looking to improve upon an existing application. The majority of the customers who are not looking for new equipment  want to increase their “yield” or “productivity” of the final product they are trying to produce. My first question when addressing their issue is what is the percentage of “good” product are they losing in the oversize material in their screener?  While some have a good idea of this amount others have no idea what the correlation between yield and oversize have to do with each other. Read More…

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Lab and Pilot Sieve Improvements: Starting Small with Ultrasonic Deblinding

Jeff Hochadel

Recently a customer inquired about purchasing a new lab test sieve shaker. His current laboratory sieve was an old, noisy, clunker of a test sieve shaker (I don’t think I need to name names…..). He was complaining of too many fines in the product – ground glass powder.   While the customer seemed to think his lab shaker was operating properly, he was concerned the test results were not accurate.  However, the end user of his product was also complaining Read More…

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Powder Metal Fine Mesh Screening Customizations

Jeff Hochadel

As a custom equipment manufacturer, we have quite a bit of flexibility in what we can offer.  Sometimes a screening application calls for requirements that a standard vibratory screener just cannot accommodate.

Recently, a customer asked us to redesign his powder metal screening operation in order to provide additional headroom for an additional piece of equipment. His application requirements were vacuum, two deck screening and ultrasonics on both screen decks PLUS he wanted to increase production. He currently was also Read More…

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Low Cost, High-Frequency, Screen Deblinding – Turbomite Deblinding System

Jeff Hochadel

­­Several weeks ago, I was reading an article in one of the technical journals discussing the variety of ways to eliminate screen blinding on vibratory equipment. The article discussed a number of “old school” solutions such as rubber balls, clean rings, spray nozzles and brushes. These methods have been around for decades and produce a low to moderate level of success in keeping the screen surface from blinding or clogging. The article also discussed the most effective solution for screen deblinding – Ultrasonics. While it is the most effective, ultrasonic deblinding systems are also the most expensive. If you are not familiar with ultrasonics Read More…

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Value of Industrial Vibration Part 1: $100,000/hour

Craig Macklin

As it happens, I am rather new to this industry.  My background is primarily in the world of theoretical products and service of Enterprise Software systems and implementation consulting services.  Two years ago, the uses of industrial vibrators were pretty foreign to me and anyone that I would happen to correspond with on a day-to-day basis.  I, like most people in the world, didn’t really know what a critical role industrial vibration plays in our economy.  In coming to Cleveland Vibrator Company, I did know that we made a real, tangible, product that you could put your hand on and easily identify the differences in quality that make ours better than others in the market.  I was attracted to that.  In my first year of education on our market, though, my view of the value of our product offering rapidly expanded.

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