ultrasonic screen

Jeff Hochadel

How to Reclaim up to 30% More of Your Ceramics Media

Jeff Hochadel
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During the process of manufacturing paints or other coatings, one of the steps involved is milling or grinding all of the dry ingredients into the liquid portion of the paint. These dry or solids consist of Titanium Dioxide (TIO2) pigments, binders and various other powders. The liquid portion is mainly solvent or in the case of latex base – water. Once all of these dry ingredients have been thoroughly mixed (the proper term is dispersed) into the liquid base of the paint, the next step involves a high shear, high energy process called media milling.

In a nutshell, the paint is run through a chamber that has an enclosed horizontal shaft with discs or blades. The chamber is also filled with very small, spherical, grinding media. The media is made of different materials such as glass, steel and ceramic media. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

How To Improve Ceramic Slurry Screening With Ultrasonics Deblinding System

Jeff Hochadel
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Liquid ceramic glaze or clay slurry materials are used in a variety of products and applications ranging from decorative and protective glazes to tile glaze or electrical porcelains. Typically this material starts with either Koalin clays or ceramic powders mixed with water or other liquids to form a slurry. Depending on the application this slurry will need to be screened to remove any agglomerates (powders that did not get dispersed during the mixing process). This is a very important step because in many applications, this slurry or slip will eventually be applied to an exterior surface either as a decorative or possibly a protective coating. In either case, the coating needs to be free of any oversize agglomerates or debris allowing for an attractive smooth finish free of any pits or blemishes. The finer the screen or sieve used, the better or smoother the finish.

Depending on the application, screening can range from simply pouring the slip or slurry through a filter bag with a relatively coarse mesh to using vibratory screeners with finer mesh sizes – down to 120 mesh or maybe finer. This is where the difficulties begin. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

The Importance of Product Testing for Fine Mesh Screening

Jeff Hochadel
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Many times a potential customer will call our office or email asking for a quote and delivery on a specific type of equipment. Our standard response involves asking the customer a series of questions ranging from what the product is, estimated throughput rates, percentage of plus and minus screen size, and others. We typically also ask for an application data sheet be filled out. All this helps remove the guess work out of equipment sizing.  Sometimes the customer thinks he knows what is required based on past experience or what someone else has told him he needs. While many times these assumptions may be correct, we want to make sure what we sell the customer will ultimately meet or exceed their expectations. While filling out forms and asking questions definitely assists in proper screener selection, I have found asking for a sample of the product for in house testing eliminates all the guess work out of the equipment selection process. If time permits and the customer requires we can also send out a demonstration model for a short in-house testing period.

Running tests on a sample or sending out a demonstration model will ultimately remove all the guess work out of equipment selection. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Ultrasonic Sieving Solutions For Product Contamination Complications

Jeff Hochadel
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If you are familiar with ultrasonic sieving and have concerns over contamination of your product then this blog will grab your attention. Recently one of our customers approached us with a difficult request. They needed to have an ultrasonic screener  that consisted of 100% stainless steel contact parts.  A traditional screener consisting of all stainless steel contact parts did not produce the yield and throughput needed for their process and inquired about providing a screener with ultrasonics. This request included the screen frame and the sieving surface (wire mesh) had to be free of any adhesives, etc..

Since our standard ultrasonic frames are machined aluminum this posed a challenge for us. Although we have tried making stainless steel screen frames in the past, the density of the stainless gave us some issues in transmitting out ultrasonics through the frame and across the screen surface. The second requirement of the screen surface being clear of any transducers which was an easy one for us since we currently do not attach our  Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Fine Powder Screening and Timely Solutions: Ultrasonic Sieving Systems

Jeff Hochadel
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Sometimes a screening application cannot be solved by simply placing the product on the sieve surface and allowing the screener to do its job. While a round screener is meant to separate product by particle size, sometimes this simple process can cause problems or damage the product. Recently, a customer inquired about fine mesh ultrasonic sieving of his solder powder. While I am no expert in the production of solder powder, I do know solder powder is generally a very spherical powder (see pic below) and sieves very well when applying ultrasonic to the screen surface. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Fine Mesh Screening Problem? Optimize Your Vibratory Screening Equipment Solution

Jeff Hochadel
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Vibratory screening equipment comes in all shapes and sizes. While some are rectangular or round they all pretty much accomplish the same principal which is removing oversize particles from the desired product size. There are a number of variables that can affect the performance of the screens used on your screening equipment.  In this blog I will discuss a number of ways to optimize your vibratory screening equipment. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Innovative Solutions to Industrial Fine Mesh Screening Challenges from Cleveland Vibrator Co.

Jeff Hochadel
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Over the years I have handled hundreds of sales calls. Some are looking for new equipment while other are looking to improve upon an existing application. The majority of the customers who are not looking for new equipment  want to increase their “yield” or “productivity” of the final product they are trying to produce. My first question when addressing their issue is what is the percentage of “good” product are they losing in the oversize material in their screener?  While some have a good idea of this amount others have no idea what the correlation between yield and oversize have to do with each other. Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Powder Metal Fine Mesh Screening Customizations

Jeff Hochadel
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As a custom equipment manufacturer, we have quite a bit of flexibility in what we can offer.  Sometimes a screening application calls for requirements that a standard vibratory screener just cannot accommodate.

Recently, a customer asked us to redesign his powder metal screening operation in order to provide additional headroom for an additional piece of equipment. His application requirements were vacuum, two deck screening and ultrasonics on both screen decks PLUS he wanted to increase production. He currently was also Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Low Cost, High-Frequency, Screen Deblinding – Turbomite Deblinding System

Jeff Hochadel
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­­Several weeks ago, I was reading an article in one of the technical journals discussing the variety of ways to eliminate screen blinding on vibratory equipment. The article discussed a number of “old school” solutions such as rubber balls, clean rings, spray nozzles and brushes. These methods have been around for decades and produce a low to moderate level of success in keeping the screen surface from blinding or clogging. The article also discussed the most effective solution for screen deblinding – Ultrasonics. While it is the most effective, ultrasonic deblinding systems are also the most expensive. If you are not familiar with ultrasonics Read More…

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Jeff Hochadel

Avoiding Costly Problems in Screening Ceramic Powders

Jeff Hochadel
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As the Sales Manager here at HK Technologies, I run across many unique and challenging screening applications on a weekly basis. While this is my first post and I have a lot of interesting applications to discuss, I want to begin with a recent application where a customer was using ultrasonic sieving to screen a high value ceramic powder used in the electronics industry.  The screen mesh was fairly coarse – 80 mesh. The ceramic powder was agglomerating and forming hard nodules of ceramic material from the current suppliers ultrasonic system. The customer could not tolerate these hard nodules contaminating the final product. They approached us for a solution.

              

Pic 1                                       Pic 2                                 Pic 3 – HK Tranducer – no screen contact

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